Rappaport’s Law and Segregation in the Magical U.S.

In 1790, the magical community in North America experienced something we’ve read in No-Maj history books since childhood, but have yet to officially hear about in Rowling’s Harry Potter universe.

A complete segregation of individuals due to prejudice and hatred.

mudblood.gif

In the Potter books and films, we are introduced to the concept of “mudbloods”, a witch or wizard born from both magical and non-magical parents. Mixed blood. Throughout the story, we see the hurt and the evil that is inflicted upon those of mixed heritage, but never have we heard of a government enforced ban on the interaction and marriage of no-maj and magical people.

Pottermore’s History of Magic in North America series revealed today that due to an unfortunately deceitful relationship between a witch and a no-maj man,

the fifteenth President of MACUSA, Emily Rappaport, instituted a law designed to create total segregation of the wizarding and No-Maj communities.

Unlike many pieces of Potter fan fiction highlighting muggle/no-maj and magical relationships (some of my favorites), their story doesn’t end in the couple riding off on their brooms into the sunset. Their interactions result in completely changing the history of their people.

This new information gives us unsettling insight into the prejudice and discrimination we encounter throughout the series. When does the world first begin using terms like “mudblood”? Do the Americans have a different harsh and harmful word?

Did prejudice against the magical birth prejudice against the non-magical?

This is huge news, as every day it seems we learn more about the wizarding world leading up to Fantastic Beasts. Here’s hoping that these tidbits lead to more parallels between the magical world and our own.

Bekahsig

 

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